During the week of June 27th thru July 4th the Preservation Trades Network (PTN) partnered with the Timber Framers Guild (TFG), the Dry Stone Conservancy and the Slate Roof Contractors Association to hold their first Preservation Rendezvous in Frankfort Kentucky. The event was most graciously hosted by the Kentucky Heritage Council, The Frankfort Tourist Commission and the City of Frankfort parks department who showed the participants what a real Kentucky welcome means. The week started with two workshops. One was the beginning of a historic restoration project which will be completed next fall when PTN holds their International Preservation Trades Workshop (IPTW) in Frankfort. Students of that workshop learned how to properly document and deconstruct an early 19th century log structure which was original used for curing meat. During the process of studying the remaining historic fabric the students were able to define all of the historic characteristics of the building which will allow the restoration to take the building back to its c1820 appearance authentically. The second workshop involved using traditional timber frame construction methods to layout and fabricate a picnic pavilion for the River View Park on the Kentucky River in downtown Frankfort. The building was hand raised on the opening day of the Rendezvous and roofed with a “fish scale” pattern slate roof. Even Frankfort’s mayor Gippy Graham grabbed a pike pole and help push up the first bent. The rendezvous that followed featured traditional trades people demonstrating to attendees and the general public the skills that they use in their particular trade which included dry stone masonry, log construction, hand hewing timbers, raising and rigging, slate and tile roofing, blacksmithing, window restoration, wooden shingle riving, tool handle making and tool sharpening. The citizens of Frankfort who stopped by were welcomed and had a chance to meet tradespeople who are keeping these traditional trades alive and employing them in preserving America’s historic architecture. The young people of Frankfort were even invited to raise the mini-barn brought by Paul Knoebel of Friends of Ohio Barns. The workshops were educational and the weekend long Rendezvous was festive for sure, but the most valuable and enjoyable part was the camaraderie and opportunity to make new friends and enjoy time with old ones that partnering between the various trades organizations created. Evenings were spent at community meals cooked in the camp kitchen and sitting around the campfire telling stories and playing music. Friendly competition offered by a variety of outdoor games brought back memories of summer camps and family outings and created a very real feeling of community that’s hard to find at gatherings held in big hotel conference centers. Preservation Rendezvous 2009 promises to be the beginning of a new kind of partnership programming that is destined to bring about bigger and better community based events in the future.

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The 13th annual International Preservation Trades Workshop was held by the Preservation Trades Network in partnership with the Colorado Mountain College Historic Preservation program. The 3rd International Trades Education Symposium was held in conjunction with IPTW 2009. These combined events will take place in the spectacular natural setting of the Rocky Mountains. Both events provided unique opportunities for tradespeople, educators, architects, preservationists, students and others from the US and abroad to network while sharing experiences, learning new skills and finding common ground in their experiences relating to trades education and “hands on” conservation of the built environment. Workshops, "hands on" demonstrations of preservation techniques and symposium sessions took place in historic Leadville, Colorado and at the Hayden Ranch National Register Historic site, an intact example of a high country ranch and agricultural operations c.1872-1947. Colorado Mountain College purchased the ranch for use as a learning laboratory, interpretive site, and classroom space for students in the preservation trades program.

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Date City State Askins
August 25-29, 2009 Leadville Colorado Robert Adam
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The World Monuments Fund, Preservation Trades Network, and the University of Florida sponsored an interdisciplinary eight-week program that combined historic preservation, traditional trades, green design, and sustainable construction. Graduate students in historic preservation, architecture and engineering from the University of Texas, Florida A&M University, Harvard, and Florida Gulf Coast University traveled to New Orleans in June to participate in the field school program.

The students worked with instructors from the University of Florida and the Preserrvation Trades Network to help restore historic structures in Holy Cross, a neighborhood located in the Ninth Ward of New Orleans. Holy Cross was severely damaged by hurricane Katrina. Subjects covered in the eight-week field school included:

  • Survey, documentation, and pathologies of flood damaged historic buildings
  • Sustainable design, conservation and rehabilitation practices
  • Repair and reuse of wooden window sash, porch and trim elements
  • Repair and conservation of interior finishes
  • Repair of masonry and wood structural systems

Visit the the World Monuments Fund Blog on the 2008 Field School.

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Date City State
June 9-August 1, 2008 New Orleans Louisiana
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The 12th annual International Preservation Trades Workshop was held July 18-20, 2008 by the Preservation Trades Network, in partnership with the Vermont Granite Museum and Stone Arts School and the Preservation Education Institute and Historic Windsor, Inc. Participants from more than 20 states and 5 countries traveled to Barre, Vermont, a place where this year’s workshop theme – “A Place for the Trades” – holds special meaning. With its long and proud tradition of workmanship, industry and multi-cultural heritage, Barre is a living example of the traditions, challenges and opportunities facing everyone who cares about conservation of the built environment, maintaining livable communities and creating opportunities for respected and valued employment for people in the trades. A full slate of pre-IPTW workshops and activities preceded the opening of IPTW 2008 on July 18th. Neil Rippingale of the Dry Stone Conservancy of Lexington, Kentucky led a two-day drystone walling workshop at the event site, and PTN volunteers constructed a performance stage for the Vermont Granite Museum to remain as a lasting reminder of a successful partnership. Students and instructors from the Historic Preservation Program at Colorado Mountain College worked with local volunteers and members of the New England Blacksmiths Association to install a historic line shaft system and machine tools for an operating blacksmith shop at the Vermont Granite Museum. IPTW 2008 opened with the keynote address “Wood, Stone and Iron” given by noted timber framer Jan Lewandoski. For the next three days, participants attended sessions by an eclectic mix of veteran and first time IPTW presenters on window repair, wood and slate carving, painting and plaster, timber framing, stone and masonry techniques, tools and machines and much more. Informative lectures were given on many subjects, including trades education programs in Falmouth Jamaica, Scandinavia, France, Colorado and Kentucky, and a panel discussion on the Vermont granite industry. IPTW 2008 slideshows More than forty demonstrators and speakers shared their skills and knowledge in the immense, timber framed granite cutting shed of the former Jones Brothers Granite Company, used by generations of granite carvers, many of whom came to Barre from Italy in the late 19th century drawn by its reputation as the “Granite Capitol of the World”. Indeed the town is full of lovely carved granite buildings. Sadly, the cemeteries show the sadness of the loss of many of the young Italian “scappolinis” to silicosis before vacuum systems were installed, who are memorialized with beautiful and highly personal monuments at Barre’s famous Hope Cemetery. On Friday evening the Barre Historical Society presented the film, “If Stone Could Speak” to benefit the continuing restoration of the National Historic Landmark Socialist Labor Party Hall. The film explored in wonderful detail the experiences of the Italians carvers who came to Barre. An IPTW tradition continued when PTN musicians took the stage along with the ROGUE BIRDS, a talented central Vermont band, for a rousing evening of music at the Vermont Granite Museum. On Saturday evening everyone enjoyed an excellent dinner at the Vermont Granite Museum, and a welcome by Tom Lauzon, Mayor of the City of Barre, followed by presentation of the 2008 Askins Achievement Award to David Gibney of Smithsburg, Maryland. J. Michael Logan, Supervisor of Heritage Conservation, with the Howard County Recreation and Parks Department, introduced David citing his outstanding craftsmanship, dedication to teaching and sharing his skills, and his distinguished record of public service for Habitat for Humanity, PTN and the people of New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. After the awards presentation, the ever popular annual PTN live auction helped raise much needed funds for PTN’s continued work to promote the traditional trades and trades education. Another highlight of this year’s IPTW was the opportunity to recognize Judy Hayward and the Preservation Education Institute of Windsor, Vermont for 25 years of innovative and distinguished accomplishment in preservation education and contributions to the traditional trades. Judy was recognized by Patricia L. Meriam, Vice President of the Vermont Granite Museum and Stone Arts School, and presented with a Lifetime PTN Membership on behalf of the Board of Directors of the Preservation Trades Network. PTN Executive Director, Rudy Christian, led the annual membership meeting on July 20th to provide an open forum for discussion of current and future PTN projects and initiatives including the 2008 Field School held this summer in New Orleans in partnership with the University of Florida and World Monument Fund, and the announcement of the IPTW 2009 venue. Mark your calendars now for August 25-29, 2009, when IPTW 2009 and the 3rd International Trades Education Symposium (ITES) will be held in Leadville, Colorado in partnership with the Historic Preservation Program of Colorado Mountain College. It was a fulfilling weekend in a remarkable venue steeped in history and resonant with the legacy of the trades. PTN is proud to recognize Tradweb, Granite City Tool Company of Vermont, Harpoon Brewery, Christian and Son, Inc., Miles Supply Company and the Timber Framers Guild for their generous support and sponsorship.

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Date City State Askins
July 18-20, 2008 Barre Vermont David Gibney
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On June 2nd and 3rd, 2007, Casey Farm in Saunderstown, Rhode Island hosted the Preservation Trades Network’s regional Preservation Trades Workshop in partnership with Historic New England and Heritage Restoration, Inc. This two-day event brought together preservation tradespeople, architects, preservation organization staff members, historic property stewards, state and local government employees, preservation students, and homeowners to promote the preservation trades, educate, and create exchanges between preservation professionals and the public through interactive demonstrations, learning sessions, and one-on-one discussions. The Casey Farm Preservation Trades Workshop was held on the fields of Casey Farm, under tents, in the open air, and in the barns. Interactive demonstrations took place over the weekend, using props or actual conservation, restoration or construction projects selected on the farm. The demonstrators displayed their craft, using traditional trade techniques, tools, and experience, on an on-going basis throughout each day while answering questions and interacting with attendees. A one on one discussion area was provided to “ask the professional” specific questions or to engage in conversations regarding preservation issues. Guided tours of the house, farmyard, and cemetery, where six generations of Caseys are buried, were be provided. On Saturday, the Farmer’s Market took place at Casey Farm in conjunction with the Preservation Trades Workshop. Casey Farm is a mid 18th-century homestead overlooking Narragansett Bay and the center of a plantation that produced food for local and foreign markets. Located near Newport, Casey Farm had access to material goods imported from England, enabling its early owners to live in a fashionable manner. Casey Farm’s prosperity ended with the burning of Newport during the Revolution, and the farm settled into a pattern of absentee ownership. Starting in the mid 19th-century, the Casey family began to improve the farm, leasing the property to tenant farmers. Today, resident farm managers raise organically grown vegetables, herbs, and flowers for subscribing households in a Community Supported Agriculture program.
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The National Park Service Historic Preservation Training Center shop facility at the historic Jenkins Cannery was the main venue for the 10th Anniversary IPTW and a more diverse group of demonstrations, presentations and workshop sessions than any previous IPTW. Among the almost 80 demonstrators and presenters were veterans of past IPTWs and many new, first-time presenters offering interactive "hands on" demonstrations of timber framing, carpentry, plastering, brick and stone masonry, painting and decorative finishes, roofing and metal work, and many other trades and allied disciplines. Other sessions covered education and much more of interest to the preservation community. The annual Live Auction was one of the most successful in PTN history, and the joint PTN/APT-DC reception at Cafe 611 will be long remembered for great live music and a special performance of the "Limeworks Blues" by Andy DeGruchy and the Limeworks Dancers. A special PTN Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to J. Bryan Blundell, founding member and former PTN Managing Director by Clem Labine, founder of the Old House Journal and Traditional Building. Dr. Gerard C.J. Lynch, internationally acclaimed historic brickwork consultant and master bricklayer, was presented with the 2007 Askins Achievement Award by James S. (Jim) Askins, and nominator John William Laing of Edinburgh's Telford College. One of the highlights of IPTW 2007 was the creation of a carved brick medallion by Dr. Lynch representing the landmark church spires of Frederick, Maryland as depicted on the town seal. The Frederick Medallion was presented as a gift to the Frederick Tourism Bureau and will find a permanent home in the new Frederick Visitor Center currently undergoing rehabilitation.

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Date City State Askins
2007 Frederick Maryland Dr. Gerard C.J. Lynch
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Demonstrators and educators from Europe and North America gathered in the beautiful Lake Siljan Region for the first PTN event to be held outside North America. Workshop sessions explored the them "Leadership for the Trades: A Global Priority Issue" in the 2nd International Trades Education Symposium and concurrent International Preservation Trades Workshop. The sysposium was sponsored by the Preservation Trades Network (PTN), Dalarna Region Cooperation Council, GMV Centre for Environment and Sustainability Chalmers University of Technology and Göteborg University, and the Swedish Construction Federation. The conference was designed to further define the role of the trades within an international context as an aspect of sustainability, leadership and collaboration. The main conference theme "Leadership" was selected to suggest that the traditional crafts themselves must take an active role in demonstrating that capability, and developing dialogue with the academic sector, industry stakeholders, the business community, NGOs and governmental agencies to improve educational and employment opportunities, and improve public perceptions of the value and significance of the traditional and skilled trades. In addition to three days of formal presentations by conference participants, local tradespeople staged demonstrations of log building and restoration, traditional Swedish fence building, clay parging, blacksmithing and roofing. Additional acitivities included excursions to the Falun World Heritage Site, a tour of restoration work in progress at the Royal Palace in Stockholm, and the Vasa Museum.
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Date City Country
2007 Tällberg Sweden
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In partnership with Save Our Cemeteries, the World Monuments Fund, and the American College of the Building Arts, PTN offered a five day pre-IPTW Conservation and Repair Workshop at New Orleans' historic Lafayette Cemetery No. 1. The workshop offered education and training opportunities in the conservation of brick masonry, stone, plaster and cast iron.

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October 21-25, 2006 New Orleans Louisiana
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On August 12-13, 2006 the Preservation Trades Network and New Castle Historical Society held the 1st Regional Preservation Trades Workshop modeled on the International Preservation Trades Workshop (IPTW) format. The New Castle Workshop featured masters of the traditional building trades, presenting "hands on" demonstrations of preservation and restoration techniques in the heart of New Castle's National Historic Landmark District including demonstrations on:

  • Restoring wood windows and doors
  • Historic paints and finishes
  • Plaster repair
  • Timber framing
  • Masonry repair and restoration
  • Stained glass repair and conservation

The New Castle Workshop drew a diverse audience of tradespeople, architects, preservation organization staff members, historic property stewards, state and local goverment employees, homeowners, and the curious to the town Green in the heart of New Castle's National Historic Landmark District. This event provided learning opportunities for people of all ages and backgrounds.

Partners

Since its founding in 1934, the New Castle Historical Society has worked to promote historical awareness, and encourage the preservation of historical architecture, documents and material culture in New Castle. Three historic houses owned by the Society: the Amstel House, Dutch House and Old Library Museum are open to the public for group and individual tours. The Historical Society is also involved in educating the public about the history of New Castle and in disseminating information through exhibits, programs, lectures, publications and resource materials. Other local partners included:

  • City of New Castle
  • Delaware Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs
  • Historical Society of Delaware
  • Historic Area Commission of New Castle
  • New Castle Visitors BureauVelocipede Museum

Thanks to all the presenters, partners and sponsors who helped make this such a successful event. Special thanks to Duffy Hoffman, Rhonda Deeg, Bruce Dalleo, Cara Blume, Debbie Martin and all of the NCHS volunteers. Thanks also to Mon-Ray, Inc. for their support of the New Castle Preservation Trades Workshop.

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Date City State
August 12-13, 2006 New Castle Delaware

The 10th annual International Preservation Trades Workshop was as different from other IPTW’s as New Orleans is unique among American cities. From the smell of Cajun cooking in the air, to the sight of ships passing along the levee above the main event location, it was clear that this was no ordinary venue when IPTW 2006 came to the Holy Cross Neighborhood of New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward, October 26-28th, with the theme "Rebuilding Hope and Reclaiming Heritage". Since Hurricane Katrina devastated the historic neighborhoods of New Orleans, PTN has been working with the World Monuments Fund, and our local partner the Holy Cross Neighborhood Association to help local residents rebuild and return home through initiatives like the Mobile Preservation Unit, and repair demonstration project at the Greater Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church. IPTW 2006 took this to a new level, by waiving the usual workshop registration fee and inviting all to join us in an open workshop setting designed to promote learning and sharing the knowledge of the trades for all who care about restoring these communities. In response, more than one hundred members of the PTN community from 26 states, and as far as Scotland, Canada and Sweden, came to New Orleans to work and learn side by side with local residents on four demonstration repair projects in Holy Cross. The 2006 recipient of the Askins Achievement award was Earl Barthé, a 5th generation plasterer whose great-great-grandfather, a master plasterer from Nice, France, settled in New Orleans in the mid-1800s and established a family business that is still in operation today.

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Date City State Askins
2006 New Orleans Louisiana Earl Barthé
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