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  • February 28, 2024 9:06 PM | Mark Johnston (Administrator)

    https://www.sandersmortuary.com/obituary/Sarah-Jackson

    Sarah M. Jackson

    April 27, 1981 ~ January 26, 2024 (age 42)

    Sarah Jackson Obituary

    To watch Sarah's memorial service please click here 

    Sarah M. Jackson, 42, of Trout Run, passed peacefully in her sleep on Friday, January 26, 2024, after her courageous battle with cancer.

    Born April 27, 1981 in Williamsport, she was a daughter of the late Robert L. Jackson and Donna J. (Lose) Jackson of Trout Run.

    Sarah's life, though shorter than we hoped, was lived to the fullest. Sarah graduated from Choctaw High School, Choctaw, OK, and then from Texas A&M with a Bachelor’s degree of Architecture in Environmental Design. She then went on to graduate with a Master’s degree in Historical Preservation from Savannah College of Art and Design. For 10 years, she worked for the United States Park Services in Natchitoches, LA and currently was working for General Services of the United States Government in Washington, D.C. as a Historical Preservation Specialist for the last five years.  

    Sarah left an indelible mark on the hearts of those she touched, and her memory will be cherished as a treasure in the story of their lives. She approached every day with a heart full of love and a soul ready to explore the beauty of the world. Above all, Sarah believed her greatest gift and accomplishment was her sweet daughter, Leigh.

    She loved traveling, hiking, photography, entertaining and rescuing dogs. Over the years, Sarah opened her heart and home to rescue over 50 dogs, each one a cherished companion and a life saved by her kindness.

    Surviving in addition to her mother, is her daughter, Leigh C. Jackson, a brother Jason Jackson (Jen Cathor) of Shippensburg, a niece Mackenzie Jackson, and many aunts, uncles, cousins, friends, and her fur-babies Lucy, Hank, and Penelope.

    The family will receive friends from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, February 17 at Sanders Mortuary, 821 Diamond Street, Williamsport, followed by a memorial service at 3:30 p.m. Burial will be at the convenience of the family in Trout Run Cemetery.

    In lieu of flowers or food memorial contributions in Sarah’s name may be made to a scholarship fund that has been set-up for her daughter, donations may be made to Donna Jackson c/o Leigh Jackson Scholarship Fund, PO Box 222 Trout Run, PA 17771

    Online condolences and a recording of the memorial service may be found on her memorial page at www.SandersMortuary.com


  • January 28, 2024 10:09 PM | Mark Johnston (Administrator)

    It is with great sadness that the Preservation Trades Network Board of Directors informs our members that Sarah Marie Jackson passed in her sleep on January 26, 2024 following a courageous battle with cancer.

    Sarah served on the PTN Board for 7 years in nearly every executive position, most recently as President from 2018-2020. She proudly worked with Historic Environment Scotland for the Sterling, Scotland IPTW in 2019.

    We will post more about Sarah and her work with PTN. If you would like more information, please see her Facebook page.

    Donations can be made on Sarah’s behalf to her favorite shelter and charity FAUNA, PO Box 2552, Natchitoches, LA 71547.

    We will miss you, Sarah.


  • December 10, 2023 11:42 AM | Mark Johnston (Administrator)

    Here are the applicants for the Preservation Trades Network board of directors openings. Please take some time to learn all about them and be prepared to vote!.

    Mo Karnage

    Karnage Construction LLC

    I was genetically predisposed to a life of sawdust and old houses. My great grandpa founded on of the the architectural salvage places in town, and my grandpa and dad ran a cabinetry and millwork company. I learned how to use a tape measure before most kids learn how to read. I started my own company in 2014 and am now a Class A Licensed contractor with 12+ employees and a new old office building in Richmond. I worked in my 20s for various trades, including electricians, plaster folks, carpenters, and historic restoration specialists. I fell in love with old windows, and have just taken that and run with it. Preserving old houses is my jam and it suits my ethics as well. I'm on the Jr board for Historic Richmond and involved in their events. Projects I was the GC for won Golden Hammer awards (local historic preservation/construction award) in 2021 and 2022.

    Why do you want to be on the board?

    I'm a virgo. No, basically I want to dig in hard and grow my business and make it level up, which can not be done in a vacuum. A rising tide lifts all boats and in historic preservation there has to be cooperation and comradeship in order to keep us relevant, staffed, and up to snuff. I want to be a part of that! We need more people involved in this work and to form tighter bonds with preservation advocacy people, as well as engage in more public education. They aren't making any new old buildings.

    What might you like to accomplish or have as a goal if elected to be a board member?

    Increase participation in conferences and workshops, increase marketing. I'm pretty decent on Canva and would love to help get more images out there. I think making info graphics and how-to type sheets would be cool as heck.

    Chad Nelson

    Red Beard Restoration

    Bio

    Chad Nelson stumbled into preservation after he and his husband bought an old Victorian house with storm windows made of unmilled 2x4s and plexiglass. Wanting to preserve the home properly, Chad learned how to make wooden storm windows, with some bumps along the way. After connecting with other window professionals in his city of Des Moines, Iowa, and learning more about proper techniques and materials, his window restoration company, Red Beard Restoration, was born. He now specializes in full window restorations, Mon-Ray storm window installations and new wooden storm window builds. A board member of his historic neighborhood’s neighborhood association and his city’s Historic Preservation Commission, Chad is a vocal advocate of repairing over replacing, and of protecting an area’s sense of place and revitalizing communities through historic preservation.

    Why do you want to be on the board?

    My business would have never gotten off the ground without the amazing support and guidance of two other local window preservationists in my city. One of them gave me my first three clients, and the other answered (and continues to answer) every question I threw at her. It's now my turn to pay it forward. I can do that by being part of the Preservation Trades Network, which is building a much larger network full of people like those that helped me get started.

    What might you like to accomplish or have as a goal if elected to be a board member?

    I am admittedly a relatively new member of this organization, though I am extremely excited to be a part of it. My immediate goal would be to connect with the other board members to learn as much as I can about the inner workings of the board so I can best understand how to apply my skills and knowledge for the betterment of the organization. Beyond that, I would hope to use my previous professional background in journalism/public affairs to help spread the word of the Preservation Trades Network to as many people as possible.

    Rebecca Torsell


    Wittenberg University, Eastern Michigan University, Belmont College

    Bio

    I have a diverse background in the field of historic preservation that relates to multiple different facets. In my current position as the Director of Historic Preservation at the Edsel and Eleanor Ford House, I struggle to find qualified preservation trades contractors, and I know the importance of supporting the historic trades. Prior to taking on my current role, I have had a number of positions as an historic tradesperson (contractor/subcontractor). My experiences range widely across the spectrum of preservation. In years past I’ve worked with Historic Corps as a Crew Leader which included living in a tent for 2 months while restoring an historic log mining camp at 11,000 feet in the San Jaun Mountains of Colorado. My career path also led me to Philadelphia where I worked for Kreilick Conservation, LLC as a project manager and conservator. Some of the more notable projects I worked on included the Grant Memorial in Washington D.C., The Second Bank of the United States, and the Cooper-Hewitt Smithsonian Museum of Design. I became very familiar with bronze conservation and my experiences led me to become a certified Professional member with the American Institute for Conservation. I’ve worked under and with wonderful mentors should as Jim Turner, David Gibney, and Patrick Kennedy. I have a great respect for the historic trades now currently in the role of Owner/Client, but for the majority of my career I served as the historic tradesperson. It has helped me to see how both sides need to come together to support the trades and the education of new tradespeople. It is my love of historic buildings, the sustainability of the practice of preservation, and my eagerness to always learn more that drives me. My education includes a Bachelor of Arts in Management and World Culture from Wittenberg University, a Master of Science in Historic Preservation from Eastern Michigan University, and an Applied Associates of Science in Building Restoration and Preservation Technology from Belmont College. These are listed in the order received. I went back to school for my Associates after my master’s degree to acquire additional hands-on experience. I believe that my diversity of roles, experiences, and education will help me to serve the PTN board successfully

    Why do you want to be on the board?

    Over the course of many years, I’ve attended multiple conferences for a variety of networks/organizations. PTN’s conference, IPTW, was what I would consider the most valuable. It was deeply rooted in the trades and demonstrated the root of what we strive for, successful preservation. It was all possible because of the Board of Directors, and I’d like to help support these efforts.

    Being a part of PTN’s Board of Directors gives me a chance to give more to the preservation trades and the struggle to keep growing them.

    What might you like to accomplish or have as a goal if elected to be a board member?

    I feel like I need to learn more before I can say a goal I would like to accomplish, but in general I would be interested in trying to expand membership and strengthening relationships with similar preservation organizations.

    Daniel Totten

    Talis Historic Restoration

    Bio

    Like most in the Historic trades, Dan never set out to be a restorer. He grew up in a farmhouse in the Hudson Valley of New York, where he spent most of his time playing basketball, then discovered art, which he pursued at Alfred University. After graduating he moved back to the Hudson Valley and worked a myriad of odd jobs and ended up farming for several years, and founded a Makerspace at a local community center. In 2020 he relocated to Buffalo and decided to get a Masters in Library Science. He then needed money so he got a job with a Window Restorer. With his eclectic experience and love for the old he quickly fell in love with the trade, and is still enthusiastically going at it (suffice to say he dropped out of grad school). He currently lives with his wife in Rochester, NY, and works for Talis Historic Restoration, where he manages site work and does commercial estimates (and will mill, glaze, scrape, or install sash at a moments notice).

    Why do you want to be on the board?

    My Restoration journey started with working under Steve Swiatt at Northwood Historic Restoration in Buffalo, NY. Steve would talk about the numerous workshops for local nonprofits he did, and the advice and conversations that he had with other restorers and people trying to get into the trade. After spending more time in the trade and attending WPA events and the most recent Window Preservation Standards Collaborative Summit, I realize that his openness to share his craft wasn't unusual. I have found this field full of people who love the work and want to spread information to as many as possible. Although I've only been restoring for 3 years, I now find myself wanting to give back in some capacity.

    What might you like to accomplish or have as a goal if elected to be a board member?

    While I've had experience being on the board of various clubs at college and I've worked within nonprofits to a limited extent, I've never been a board member of an actual organization. My main goal as a board member would be to make an effort to be fully present at meetings and be helpful towards progressing PTN goals, whether that is to create the annual IPTW, increase membership, or create newsletters. Overall, it seems like a great opportunity for me to grow my own skills in group work and leadership while creating awareness of the Preservation Trades.

    Jake Jones

    Medicine Wood LLC

    Bio

    Jake is the owner of Medicine Wood Heritage Restoration Co., located in St. Paul, Minnesota. His company offers various preservation services, including window restoration, plastering, project consultation, and more. Jake holds a BA in Religious Studies from Gustavus Adolphus College.

    Jake enjoys growing organic vegetables, cooking, playing guitar, and spending time with his wife and daughter. 

    Why do you want to be on the board?

    I am passionate about the preservation trades, and I believe my experience and skills may help further the PTN mission.

    What might you like to accomplish or have as a goal if elected to be a board member?

    I want to help grow PTN's audience and network and facilitate learning opportunities for the next generation of preservation trade workers.











  • November 16, 2023 8:22 PM | Natalie Henshaw (Administrator)

    APPLY HERE

    Applications close December 1, 2023.

    Are you interested in helping move the PTN mission forward? Join the Board of Directors! Applications are now open for positions beginning in 2024.

    As 2023 comes to a close, we want to tank four outgoing board members for their commitment, service, and contributions to PTN over the last few years--Amanda Warren, Jane Griswold Raddochia, Jim Turner, and Leslie Price. While we are always remiss when dedicated board member close out their terms, we look forward to what new board members bring to the organization.

    Candidates should have a vested interest in the PTN mission and vision. Board members are expected to:

    • Be a PTN member in good standing or become one;
    • Commit to a 3-year Board Term;
    • Attend a monthly virtual Board Meeting on the third Thursday at 7 pm EST;
    • Participate in one Committee;
    • Contribute at least one hour per week to board work in addition to board and committee meetings;
    • Attend the annual Face to Face Board Meeting;
    • Plan and attend the International Preservation Trades Workshop;
    • Have a basic familiarity with the internet and software functions;
    • Use assigned @ptn.org gmail account and respond to communications in a timely and professional manner; 
    • Act as an official ambassador of and liaison for the Preservation Trades Network; and
    • Agree to and abide by the PTN Code of Ethics

    Additionally, the Board of Directors is looking for people with skills or interest in learning any of the following:

    • Google Workspace for Nonprofits
    • Wild Apricot Member and Website Management
    • QuickBooks Online and budgeting
    • Design software like Canva or Photoshop
    • Communications and communications tools like eblasts, newsletters, website maintenance, and social media
    • Project management and event planning
  • August 18, 2023 2:00 PM | Natalie Henshaw (Administrator)

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship is a fund to help students, apprentices, and emerging professionals attend the International Preservation Trades Workshop. Founded in 2016, this scholarship is named in memory of Misia Leonard. Misia served on the PTN Board of Directors and was a strong advocate for the preservation of our cultural heritage. For over 20 years, she worked for the City of New York, spending the last eight of those as Director of the Historic Preservation Office for the Department of Design and Construction. While serving on the PTN Board of Directors, she was instrumental in the development of AIA/CES program. 

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship was dedicated in her honor in 2016. Since then, five students and apprentices annually receive financial assistance to attend the IPTW. This has been a great avenue for emerging professionals to learn about different trades, meet craftspeople, and get engaged with PTN. The Scholarship is supported by proceeds from the annual auction at IPTW. Five different people were awarded scholarships to attend the 2022 IPTW at Belmont College. In the lead up to the 25th IPTW, we will feature one of their stories each month. This month we feature Maura Smith.

    This year, up to 25 students, apprentices, and emerging professionals will able to attend the IPTW for free. Those students can submit an application for waived registration here, and also apply for the Misia Leonard Scholarship. Consider donating to the PTN Scholarship Fund through direct donations and donating to the annual auction.

    As a Historic Preservation M.S. graduate student at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) in Ypsilanti, Michigan I am being exposed to preservation history, theory, and some practice yet when I became aware of this scholarship opportunity, I felt immediately drawn to what this workshop might represent in my journey and the doors it might open. 

    Upon arrival, after visiting with the other scholarship recipients, I learned that those chosen, represented a nice cross-section of the burgeoning preservation field. I had a great time learning more about what inspired their interest in the field, what type of training and work experience they had achieved, and what types of career aspirations and goals they had. I have found that sitting around discussing freely ideas and real-life experiences with likeminded individuals can be one of the most inspiring and motivating practices of all!


    I had a blast connecting with EMU alumni (some are also Belmont graduates) and picking their brain about their current work in the preservation field as well as how the trades benefited and enhanced their marketability and knowledgebase. The name tags which we all wore made it easier for an introverted person like myself to just walk up to and speak to other attendees. I managed to make several contacts in the field who encouraged me to reach out with further questions or to stay in touch. I attended several workshops with current Belmont students and enjoyed chatting with them after sessions to learn more about what their trade course work and specializations entailed.


    I attended as many workshops as I could manage over my stent at the event! In addition to taking notes, video clips, and photographs, I did participate several times in the hands-on aspect of presentations which just drove home the experience. The experiential nature of an activity resonates with me since I learn on a number of levels: see, hear, do. I come from a contract archaeologist background (cultural resource management work for over 10 years) and I recognize that you can talk and study about how to do something until you are blue in the face but until you roll up your sleeves and get dirty the concepts are just floating around in your head.

    I enjoyed the sessions on steel square, timber framing repairs, makers mark, rock & a hard place, slate, models & casting, stucco, wood windows, steel windows, Zen masonry, etc. The keynote speaker, George Walker inspired me to look at geometry and design differently. 


    I attended the stained-glass alumni exhibit at the Sand Crest Barn and enjoyed explored the grounds. I spoke with event sponsors and learned about potential volunteer and job opportunities across the United States within both non-profits and government entities. 


    The Scottish Rite Building was a lovely place to hold the final workshop event and sets a precedence for what preservation and restoration (adaptive re-use) can accomplish. Bringing an older structure back to life can inspire a downtown block, street, or neighborhood to join in the effort to save their beloved community – One building at a time. The annual awards dinner and auction was fun to attend and entertaining to boot! I learned a great deal about holding a large-scale event and fundraising effort. These experiences will help me when I re-enter the workforce after I finish graduate school and will aid my ability to advise Laurel Valley Plantation in their efforts to preserve their vernacular structures, raise funds for restoration, and increase education and outreach. 

    Thank you again for choosing me as a Misia Leonard Scholarship recipient and for supporting women in the preservation trades! I will always remember this experience fondly and my hope is to attend future PTN events. 


    Sincerely,

    Marian C. Feinberg

  • July 13, 2023 3:50 PM | Natalie Henshaw (Administrator)

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship is a fund to help students, apprentices, and emerging professionals attend the International Preservation Trades Workshop. Founded in 2016, this scholarship is named in memory of Misia Leonard. Misia served on the PTN Board of Directors and was a strong advocate for the preservation of our cultural heritage. For over 20 years, she worked for the City of New York, spending the last eight of those as Director of the Historic Preservation Office for the Department of Design and Construction. While serving on the PTN Board of Directors, she was instrumental in the development of AIA/CES program. 

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship was dedicated in her honor in 2016. Since then, five students and apprentices annually receive financial assistance to attend the IPTW. This has been a great avenue for emerging professionals to learn about different trades, meet craftspeople, and get engaged with PTN. The Scholarship is supported by proceeds from the annual auction at IPTW. Five different people were awarded scholarships to attend the 2022 IPTW at Belmont College. In the lead up to the 25th IPTW, we will feature one of their stories each month. This month we feature Maura Smith.

    This year, up to 25 students, apprentices, and emerging professionals will able to attend the IPTW for free. Those students can submit an application for waived registration here, and also apply for the Misia Leonard Scholarship. Consider donating to the PTN Scholarship Fund through direct donations and donating to the annual auction.

    Megan McPherson at the National Council for Public History, presenting her research on George Washington Carver Park.

    Megan McPherson

    My name is Megan McPherson. I am currently working to finish up my Masters in Historic Preservation from the University of Georgia. While at UGA I have learned a lot about preservation. However, hands on preservation opportunities are limited. After working with Bill Hole and Patrick Kennedy in California in the summer of 2021 at Redwood National Park, they encouraged me to attend the International Preservation Trades Workshop to dive into the preservation trades world. I’m incredibly grateful to have been awarded the Misa Leonard Scholarship which allowed me to travel to the workshop.

    Attending the International Preservation Trades Workshop introduced me to a whole new sector of preservation. I learned ample new skills about the trades and how to restore parts of buildings. I attended several interesting workshops including terrazzo, slate roofing, blacksmithing, plaster, wood window restoration, steel window restoration, and masonry. Watching the demonstrators work on their craft was fascinating. It was amazing to learn from people who are so passionate about their work. 

    During the workshops and time in between, it was great to get to know the other workshop attendees. As someone who does not have a strong background in the preservation trades, people were incredibly eager to help explain things during the conference. While most of this conference was unchartered territory, I feel as though I left the workshop with a strong group to support me along this new journey. While this workshop was my first introduction into the preservation trades, I believe it was an important and necessary step for my career. Making memories and connections with the community of the Preservation Trades Network was incredibly valuable to me and I’m looking forward to future ITPWs.

  • May 24, 2023 2:05 PM | Natalie Henshaw (Administrator)

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship is a fund to help students, apprentices, and emerging professionals attend the International Preservation Trades Workshop. Founded in 2016, this scholarship is named in memory of Misia Leonard. Misia served on the PTN Board of Directors and was a strong advocate for the preservation of our cultural heritage. For over 20 years, she worked for the City of New York, spending the last eight of those as Director of the Historic Preservation Office for the Department of Design and Construction. While serving on the PTN Board of Directors, she was instrumental in the development of AIA/CES program. 

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship was dedicated in her honor in 2016. Since then, five students and apprentices annually receive financial assistance to attend the IPTW. This has been a great avenue for emergining professionals to learn about different trades, meet craftspeople, and get engaged with PTN. The Scholarship is supported by proceeds from the annual auction at IPTW. Five different people were awarded scholarships to attend the 2022 IPTW at Belmont College. In the lead up to the 25th IPTW, we will feature one of their stories each month. This month we feature Maura Smith.

    This year, up to 25 students, apprentices, and emerging professionals will able to attend the IPTW for free. Those students can submit an application for waived registration here, and also apply for the Misia Leonard Scholarship. Consider donating to the PTN Scholarship Fund through direct donations and donating to the annual auction.

    Carrie Miller

    A little over a month ago I was in route to the annual PTN auction, which is final event of IPTW. I was just four months into a complete career change, and attending IPTW was really my first exposure to the preservation trades and the incredible people who keep them alive. I remember thinking about how bizarre it was to already feel so comfortable with and understood by people I had just met days before. It’s rare for me to meet people that share my passion to preserve and restore the built history around us. Many of the fears and hesitance I had upon entering a new field of work simply melted away at IPTW; the resounding message I received was that I am welcomed into this community, and that I will have an important role in this community as I learn and perfect my craft.

    The value of being able to see an expert craftsperson explain, share stories, and demonstrate their experience and skill was such a joy and privilege. After attending my first workshop (Terrazo by Sarel Venter), I felt like a kid in a candy store. Not every person’s “candy store” happens to be work-related, and I realized in that moment how incredibly lucky I was! The most difficult quickly became choosing which workshops to go to – I would’ve gone to all of them twice if possible!

    Because woodworking and construction have comprised the majority of my prior hands-on experience, I intentionally tried to attend the demonstrations that I had little to no experience in: slate roofing, forging, models and casting, steel windows, wood windows, stucco repairs, and stone masonry. Each demonstrator offered an incredibly specialized perspective and gave ample space for questions. I even got the opportunity to try my hand at reglazing windows, cutting slate, and carving stone.

    As I recently became a conservation technician working with a variety of materials on historic buildings and public art, this information and these connections have been priceless for me. I refer to my notes and videos of the demonstrations from IPTW at least twice a week. The continuous novelty of the projects I am tasked with at work are far less nerve-racking knowing that I have access to a community so willing to share their experiences and advice with newcomers to the field like myself.

    I am so grateful to have been given the opportunity attend this year’s IPTW as a receiver of the Misia Leonard scholarship. I am especially grateful to PTN’s President Andrea Sevonty who welcomed me to visit her workshop to learn about her work, as well as encourage me to attend IPTW. This experience has confirmed that I am absolutely in the right career path, which is something that I did not expect to receive. I look forward to continuing my membership with PTN and expanding my knowledge, network, and skillset at next year’s IPTW!

    Dear PTN Board Members:

    One of those key people was Andrea Sevonty, who not only welcomed me to visit her stained glass workshop but also encouraged me to attend ITPW. Nothing has been more affirming for me than my experience attending ITPW.

    THANK YOU – FROM CARRIE


  • May 04, 2023 6:00 AM | Joe Tokarsky (Administrator)

    Hey Craftspeople!

    Round Two of our Call For Demonstrators IPTW 2023 is here!

    The Preservation Trades Network is looking for craft demonstrators to take part in the 2023 International Preservation Trades Workshop (IPTW) at the Historic Preservation Training Center in Frederick, Maryland.

    Please complete and submit this Application to Demonstrate, or send all application information in email form to info@ptn.org. If your application is selected, you will receive free entry into this unique, 3 day event. Before filing this form, demonstrators must review the Call For Demonstrators to see important details regarding this event.

    Thanks!

    IPTW 2023

    Thursday September 7 - Saturday September 9, 2023

    Historic Preservation Training Center

    6129 Butterfly Lane, Frederick, Maryland

  • April 15, 2023 2:10 PM | Anonymous

    New PTN Executive Board

    At PTN's semi-annual face-to-face Board Of Directors meeting this March in Frederick,  Maryland, the new executive board was reconstituted.  The current executive board is as follows: 

    • President - Joe Tokarsky 
    • Vice President - Mark Johnston 
    • Secretary - Natalie Henshaw 
    • Treasurer - Phil Mark 

    Please welcome our new e-board as they serve the needs of PTN in the coming year. Stay tuned for news, updates, and interaction about and from the full PTN board of directors and other members through our website, emails, newsletter, virtual happy hours, and in person this September at our signature event, The International Preservation Trades Workshop!



  • March 25, 2023 1:47 PM | Anonymous

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship is a fund to help students, apprentices, and emerging professionals attend the International Preservation Trades Workshop. Founded in 2016, this scholarship is named in memory of Misia Leonard. Misia served on the PTN Board of Directors and was a strong advocate for the preservation of our cultural heritage. For over 20 years, she worked for the City of New York, spending the last eight of those as Director of the Historic Preservation Office for the Department of Design and Construction. While serving on the PTN Board of Directors, she was instrumental in the development of AIA/CES program. 

    The Misia Leonard Scholarship was dedicated in her honor in 2016. Since then, five students and apprentices annually receive financial assistance to attend the IPTW. This has been a great avenue for emergining professionals to learn about different trades, meet craftspeople, and get engaged with PTN. The Scholarship is supported by proceeds from the annual auction at IPTW. Five different people were awarded scholarships to attend the 2022 IPTW at Belmont College. In the lead up to the 25th IPTW, we will feature one of their stories each month. This month we feature Maura Smith.

    This year, up to 25 students, apprentices, and emerging professionals will able to attend the IPTW for free. Those students can submit an application for waived registration here, and also apply for the Misia Leonard Scholarship. Consider donating to the PTN Scholarship Fund through direct donations and donating to the annual auction.

    Maura Smith

    Let me begin by thanking PTN for affording me the opportunity to attend the 2022 IPTW conference by awarding me with the Misia Leonard scholarship. As a beginning professional, having the opportunity to interact and study with experts in the field is priceless. While my education at Belmont College laid a solid foundation for a career in the traditional trades, there is only so much that can be learned in a classroom setting. Starting out in a new field can be rather daunting at times, especially when there is a lack of direct mentorship. When encountering new or unanticipated problems, the troubleshooting process often involves much trial and error. Having the ability to ask an experienced tradesperson what to do in these situations is a lifesaver. 

    I was thrilled to have the chance to watch many of my idols work, and assumed I would glean some new insights through observation; however, I did not expect the workshops to be so interactive. I was able to ask loads of questions that have been keeping me up at night! Perhaps the most surprising theme was that many world-renowned masters of their craft did not consider themselves to be masters at all. Every person I spoke with mentioned that there is always more to learn and each project presents a distinctive set of challenges. Further, they were eager to divulge their most prized tips and tricks. This culture of sharing one's knowledge and experience was quite unique and something that is seldom seen elsewhere. 

    I am extremely grateful to have been given the opportunity to attend the IPTW conference. I have gained an understanding of many new techniques that I may not have grasped otherwise. I engaged with a wide variety of professionals in the field, each of whom dispensed valuable wisdom and advice. The entire experience was quite momentous and I look forward to the next one! 

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